Kontakt

Dr. theol. Jordan Davis

https://uol.de/theologie/institut/personen/jordan-davis

Dr. Jordan Davis

Wissenschaftlicher Assistent im Alten Testament

Persönliches

  • In Australien geboren
  • In das Berufsleben als Ingenieur (B.Eng/B.Comp.Sci.) gestartet

 

Wissenschaftlicher Werdegang

  • 2018–2021: Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter bei Prof. Dr. Christian Frevel, Ruhr-Universität Bochum
  • 2021–2022: Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter bei Prof. Dr. Konrad Schmid, Universität Zürich
  • Ab 2022: Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter bei Prof. Dr. Benedikt Hensel, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg

 

Abschlüsse

  • Master of Divinity, Whitley College, University of Divinity in Melbourne
  • 2021: Promotion bei Prof. Dr. Konrad Schmid, Universität Zürich: “The End of the Book of Numbers: On Pentateuchal Models and Compositional Issues” (summa cum laude)

 

Forschungsschwerpunkte

  • Das Verständnis des kulturellen und ideologiegeschichtlichen Hintergrunds von biblischen Texten
  • Fokus auf die Schnittmenge von Literaturgeschichte des Alten Testaments und biblischer Archäologie/Religionsgeschichte Israels

 

Current Research (Habilitation)

“Jeremiah and the Kings of Judah: History, Politics and Theology in the Book of Jeremiah”

Given the myriad trends in Jeremiah studies, not least the current push towards postmodern reading strategies, this study rather takes up a key insight from studies on prophecy within the broader ancient Near East: Outside of the Bible, prophets were first and foremost political figures, they represented the “voice of the god/s,” who could speak “divine truth” to the king with less fear of the consequences than his other advisors, who only spoke in their own name.

Jeremiah is a book filled with words to the final kings of Judah (Josiah, Jehoiakim, Jehoiachin, Zedekiah, and [the governor] Gedeliah), he also speaks to foreign kings (Jer 27:3–11), and even nations (most famously in the so-called oracles against the nations, Jer 46–51). It seems logical, then, that Jeremiah should also be analyzed as a political figure, or rather, the book should be analyzed with politics in view.

It is also a book that operates within a distinct timeframe of Judah’s history, recent advances in archaeology have demonstrated quite convincingly that some texts in Jeremiah (e.g., Jer 2:14–37) reflect historical realities. Prior to this archaeological insight, these same texts were previously viewed metaphorically, as part of the prophet’s artistic expression.

As a biblical book, Jeremiah is also a very theological text, it reflects on Judah’s history theologically. This study takes all three of these aspects seriously and seeks to demonstrate how Jeremiah’s dealing with his kings can be informed by history/archaeology, politics and theology.

 

Publikationen

Books and Edited Volumes

  1. (2024) Hensel, Benedikt, (ed.). Transjordan and the Southern Levant: New Approaches Regarding the Iron Age and the Persian Period from Hebrew Bible Studies and Archaeology. In collaboration with Jordan Davis. ArchB. Mohr Siebeck: Tübingen.
  2. (2022) Davis, Jordan. The End of the Book of Numbers: On Pentateuchal Models and Compositional Issues. ArchB 6. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck. (Dissertation).
  3. (forthcoming) Jürg Hutzli and Jordan Davis (eds.). The Historical Location of P.
  4. (forthcoming) A Prophet to the Nations: Archaeological and Historical Perspectives on Jeremiah 46–51 (Vetus Testamentum et Orbis Antiquus/VTOA), herausgegeben von Jordan Davis und Benedikt Hensel, Göttingen: Vandenhoek & Ruprecht 2025 (in Vorbereitung).

Articles

  1. (2024) Davis, Jordan, “The Festival Legislation in Exodus and the Ideological Unity of ‘Books.’ZAW 136.1: 1–14.
  2. (2024) Davis, J.Sihon and the Problem of Israel in Transjordan.” In: Hensel, B. (ed.), Transjordan and the Southern Levant: New Approaches Regarding the Iron Age and the Persian Period from Hebrew Bible Studies and Archaeology. In collaboration with Jordan Davis. ArchB. Mohr Siebeck: Tübingen. 
  3. (2021) Davis, Jordan “Mishma.” EBR 19: 376–377.
  4. (2021) Davis, Jordan “Mithkah.” EBR 19:460.
  5. (accepted for publiction) Davis, Jordan, “Binding and Bridging in Numbers 1–10 and Numbers 26–36.In: Christian Frevel/Craig A. Evans/Benjamin Kilchör (eds.), The Book of Numbers: Composition, Reception, and Interpretation. FIOTL/VTSup. Brill: Leiden.
  6. (accepted for publiction) Davis, Jordan, “A Priestly Source in Numbers?: Transjordan and the Priestly Ideology in Numbers 32.” In: Jürg Hutzli/Jordan Davis (eds.), The Historical Location of P.
  7. (accepted for publiction) Davis, Jordan, “Sourced Authority: The Sihon Tradition and the Use of Citations to Provide External Justification.Biblische Notizen/BN.
  8. (forthcoming) Davis, Jordan, “Reuel.Encyclopedia of the Bible and its Reception.
  9. (forthcoming) Davis, Jordan, “The Festival Legislation in Numbers 28–29: A Further Step in Centralization?(submitted to JBL).

 

(Stand: 22.02.2024)  | 
Zum Seitananfang scrollen Scroll to the top of the page